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At seventeen she was teaching at a local Lancaster school. Shortly after, the couple moved to Chapel Hill, North Carolina with their first child. Hentz aided in helping an enslaved man and poet named George Moses Horton learn how to write.

After threatening to duel Colonel King, Nicholas swiftly closed down the school and the couple moved to Florence, Alabama , where they opened another school. The couple had a total of five children, though their oldest son died when he was only two years old. In , the couple opened a school in Columbus, Georgia. After nearly five years of supporting her family financially and nursing her husband, Caroline Lee Whiting Hentz died of pneumonia on February 11, Although she was primarily a teacher from the beginning, Hentz still managed to write and produce several small pieces and distribute them to local publications.

Her earlier works spoke to young men and women, mimicking religious parables and instructing them in moral goodness.

Hentz was known for "engaging in some of the most prominent public debates on the ethics and social relations of the slave system. From to , "Hentz produced several collections of stories as well as seven more novels.

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The Boston Library named her as one of the top 3 writers of the day. The prize was awarded to her for her tragedy of De Lara, or the Moorish Bride , which was produced on the stage, and afterward published in book-form. Lamorah, or the Western Wild , another tragedy, was acted at Cincinnati and published in a newspaper at Columbus, Georgia. Constance of Werdenberg , a third tragedy, remained unpublished. She was the author of numerous short poems, and a voluminous writer of tales and novelettes that were published in periodicals and newspapers, many of them collected into volumes.

In this body of work, Caroline Hentz came to the definitive defense of slavery. Hentz used her expertise, having lived for many years in the South, to claim that she was more knowledgeable about slavery than Stowe. Hentz wrote about the caring relationship between master and slave, a Southern opinion on slavery that strongly contrasted with the New England-bred Stowe's characterization of the institution. Hentz introduces in this novel several villains, including a busybody who tries to free slaves against their will. Hentz was known for "engaging in some of the most prominent public debates on the ethics and social relations of the slave system.

From to , "Hentz produced several collections of stories as well as seven more novels. The Boston Library named her as one of the top 3 writers of the day. The prize was awarded to her for her tragedy of De Lara, or the Moorish Bride , which was produced on the stage, and afterward published in book-form. Lamorah, or the Western Wild , another tragedy, was acted at Cincinnati and published in a newspaper at Columbus, Georgia.

Constance of Werdenberg , a third tragedy, remained unpublished.

She was the author of numerous short poems, and a voluminous writer of tales and novelettes that were published in periodicals and newspapers, many of them collected into volumes. In this body of work, Caroline Hentz came to the definitive defense of slavery. Hentz used her expertise, having lived for many years in the South, to claim that she was more knowledgeable about slavery than Stowe.

Caroline Lee, MD | John T. Milliken Department of Medicine Division of Hospital Medicine

Hentz wrote about the caring relationship between master and slave, a Southern opinion on slavery that strongly contrasted with the New England-bred Stowe's characterization of the institution. Hentz introduces in this novel several villains, including a busybody who tries to free slaves against their will. In doing this, she tries to discredit the abolitionist argument of inhumane treatment of the Southern slaves. She portrays the people wanting to tear down the institution of slavery as actually being motivated by personal gains, not by a desire to improve mankind.

She expanded on this motivation to include the industrial revolution that was taking place in the North, which would require the massive amounts of cheap labor that only the south could give by way of slavery. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

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The Planter's Northern Bride. Bio-bibliographical Critical Sourcebook Emmanuel S. Freedom in a Slave Society: Stories from the Antebellum South. Retrieved 1 February