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Contents:


  1. From the Gracchi to Nero : A History of Rome 133 BC to AD 68
  2. From the Gracchi to Nero: A History of Rome from 133 BC to AD 68
  3. Bestselling Series
  4. Refine your editions:
  5. Bryn Mawr Classical Review

A History of the Peloponnesian War: Barbarian Tides Walter Goffart. The Gallic Wars Julius Caesar.

From the Gracchi to Nero : A History of Rome 133 BC to AD 68

Lives of the Caesars Suetonius. Gods, Emperors and Dormice Marcia Williams. Discourses and Selected Writings Epictetus.

History of Rome, Volume Ix Livy. The Darkening Age Catherine Nixey. Emperor of All Maladies Siddharta Mukherjee. Other books in this series. Gender Trouble Judith Butler. Being and Nothingness Jean-Paul Sartre. Playing and Reality D. The Order of Things Michel Foucault. Archaeology of Knowledge Michel Foucault.

From the Gracchi to Nero: A History of Rome from 133 BC to AD 68

Bodies That Matter Judith Butler. The Location of Culture Homi K. Understanding Media Marshall McLuhan. The Culture Industry Theodor W. A Secure Base John Bowlby. Purity and Danger Professor Mary Douglas. Gravity and Grace Simone Weil. Wholeness and the Implicate Order David Bohm. Finally, one of the less obvious characteristics of the work: The selflessness expected of the Romans suggests a Christian message, and Christian coloring throughout the book seems to confirm it: Gracchus is "not a voice crying in the wilderness" 21 ; "The Gracchi were in a true sense martyrs: Later, Scullard is explicit: The book ends with the evangelism of St.

Paul, whose mission to the gentiles is facilitated by the pax Romana and whose life is saved initially anyway by possession of Roman citizenship The teleological urgency of Italian unification and the harmony of the Roman Empire become intelligible, as St. Augustine argued long ago. Every great history eventually becomes a nuisance to contemporary historians.

Bestselling Series

From the Gracchi to Nero is written not for today's student, though it has much to offer, but for privileged, Christian, English schoolboys in need of heroes and steeped in war and politics, who believe in the righteousness of empire and the march of civilization—and who incidentally can already read Latin. Many things made and make From the Gracchi to Nero a great book: The lengthy chronological table in the front is ideal for study. Scullard's presentation is balanced and unprepossessing. The work breathes an air of confident, competent scholarship, and the extensive notes give a veritable snapshot of a great generation of English scholarship on Rome, with a touch of continental learning.

The book is detailed--even too detailed--but it is perhaps this very abundance that attracts and fascinates the amateur and the enthusiast, the "general reader" who is not satisfied by generalizations and vague references, who wants to know what happened. Until Scullard's work is finally supplanted, publishers may well continue to reprint From the Gracchi to Nero. With respect to content, not character, Scullard's depiction of Roman religion, either as something native and original threatened by Eastern contamination cf.

Sertorius 76 , Spartacus 80 , Mithridates 86 , Pompey f.

Refine your editions:

On the demise of the Republic, Scullard concludes The days of the city-state were over, and Rome must recognize her responsibilities to the non-political orders in Italy and the provinces. And the Kindle version is made even harder to read by the numerous OCR errors and the fact that it's not correctly set up. For example, there is a table of contents that you can use to jump to differe This book is apparently meant for highschool students, but it's less accessible than the Penguin translations of Plutarch's work, contains a lot of untranslated Latin and big chunks that are largely names and dates.

For example, there is a table of contents that you can use to jump to different sections, but there is no way to jump to the table of contents. Some parts of this book are interesting and informative, but they're punctuated by sections that are hard to read and unintersting. For anyone with a casual interest in ancient Rome, you're better off reading Plutarch. For anyone studying seriously, there have got to be better options than this.

Bryn Mawr Classical Review

Jul 07, Siria rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a standard text for undergrads for a reason—Scullard's text provides a magisterial overview of two of the most critical centuries of Roman history, and actually helped me to grasp some of the ways in which economics impacted on contemporary political developments. It has to be read with caveats, however: A good starting point, but you'll always have to supplement it.

Jan 27, Philip Koslow rated it really liked it. Scullard presents a grand and comprehensive overview of the political, military and cultural environment that was Rome during its transition from the Republic to the Imperial era.


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It is unfortunate that the Latin quotes are not translated for the untutored. Otherwise, the narrative, although unnecessarily tedious, is a good start for a patient reader just tipping their toe into the Roman world of antiquity. Last edited in Jun 08, Anthony Dalton rated it really liked it. Had to read this for uni. An interesting read commencing at the reforms of the tribune Tiberius Gracchus and carrying through to the early stages of the Empire, when read in conjunction with the often biased work of Plutarch, one is able to develop a feel for the time and some of its central players.

Quite enjoyable really for what I can ascertain is a well known text book. This was a great first year university book. It contained however too many Latin phrases that were untranslated. I would recommend this book for students writing their first year classics history paper, which is why I purchased it for my son. A decent but not exciting read otherwise.

Murder of Tiberius Gracchus - Ancient Rome - BBC

May 11, Sean Garrett rated it liked it Shelves: A quick overview of the Julio-Claudian Emperors and how they came about, it fails in its inability to convey enough detail; a feat which would defeat the purpose of a quick overview. For anyone who is interested in a cursory study of Roman history. Feb 26, Nick Wallace rated it it was amazing. Another great overview from Scullard. Jan 03, Michael Anderson rated it it was amazing Shelves: Continuation of the previous volume.

Excellent history of Rome during the change from Republic to Empire. Jul 24, David rated it liked it Shelves: Thorough and comprehensive but not that much fun. Sep 09, Mallory rated it it was amazing Shelves: An excellent overview of a thoroughly studied era. It definitely helped me on my thesis. Hugely useful book, as a secondary source it is the cornerstone of my canon of classical Roman history. Reason rated it it was amazing Nov 06, Conrad rated it it was amazing Jan 11, Lee Mills rated it it was amazing Mar 17, Veronica Lombardi rated it it was amazing Jul 31, Donna rated it liked it Sep 11,


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