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  1. cacoethes scribendi - Latin is Simple Online Dictionary
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  4. List of Latin phrases (C)

And is one way more correct than the others? How to use a word that literally drives some people nuts. The awkward case of 'his or her'. Identify the word pairs with a common ancestor. Test your visual vocabulary with our question challenge! Start your free trial today and get unlimited access to America's largest dictionary, with: More than , words that aren't in our free dictionary Expanded definitions, etymologies, and usage notes Advanced search features Ad free!

Join Our Free Trial Now! Explore the year a word first appeared. Get Word of the Day daily email! Need even more definitions? Word of the Year 'Justice' is our Word of the Year. In economics, a counterpart to the virtuous circle. Is a phrase used in Cicero's In Verrem as a plea for the legal rights of a Roman citizen. A writ whereby the king of England could command the justice to admit one's claim by an attorney, who being employed in the king's service, cannot come in person.


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A legal action for trespass to land; so called, because the writ demands the person summoned to answer wherefore he broke the close quare clausum fregit , i. The means of discovering hidden or mysterious meanings in texts, particularly applied in theology and alchemy. In law, a writ directed to the bishop, for the admitting a clerk to a benefice upon a ne admittas , tried, and found for the party who procures the writ. In law, a writ for the delivery of a clerk out of prison, who is imprisoned upon the breach of statute merchant.

In law, a writ for the delivery of a clerk to his ordinary, that was formerly convicted of felony; by reason that his ordinary did not challenge him according to the privilege of clerks. In law, a writ directed to the bailiffs, etc. The official code of canon law in the Roman Catholic Church cf.

cacoethes scribendi - Latin is Simple Online Dictionary

Aborting sexual intercourse prior to ejaculation —the only permitted form of birth control in some religions. A medical euphemism for the doggy-style sexual position. Exhortation to enjoy fully the youth, similar to Carpe diem , from "De rosis nascentibus" also titled "Idyllium de rosis" , attributed to Ausonius or Virgil. It is frequently abbreviated comb.

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It is used in the life sciences literature when a new name is introduced, e. One year with another; on an average. A term frequently used among philosophical and other writers, implying some medium, or mean relation between several places; one place with another; on a medium. Describes someone of sound mind. Also a legal principle, non compos mentis not in control of one's faculties , used to describe an insane person.

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Motto of the University of Waterloo. It is also the Bank of Montreal coat of arms and motto. Motto of Merchant Taylors' School, Northwood.

The quod here is ambiguous: A required, indispensable condition. Commonly mistakenly rendered with conditio "seasoning" or "preserving" in place of condicio "arrangement" or "condition". Congregatio Sanctissimi Redemptoris C. Or "with united powers". Sometimes rendered conjunctis viribus. Motto of Queen Mary, University of London. Where there are no specific laws, the matter should be decided by custom; [9] established customs have the force of laws.

The last words of Jesus on the cross in the Latin translation of John Despising the secular world. The monk or philosopher 's rejection of a mundane life and worldly values. Especially in civil law jurisdictions , said of an understanding of a statute that directly contradicts its wording and thus is neither valid by interpretation nor by analogy. In contract law , the doctrine of contractual interpretation which provides that an ambiguous term will be construed against the party that imposed its inclusion in the contract — or, more accurately, against the interests of the party who imposed it.

Title of a poem by Lesya Ukrainka ; also used in the Pentateuch with reference to Abraham the Patriarch. No herb or sage grows in the gardens against the power of death. A thing or idea that would embody a contradiction , for example, payment for a gift, or a circle with corners. The fallacy of proposing such a thing. From Augustine 's Confessions , referring to a prescribed method of prayer: Commonly used in reference to a later quote by Cardinal John Henry Newman.

A motto of Newman Clubs. Your choice is between The Heart Moral Values, Duty, Loyalty or Death to no longer matter, to no longer be respected as person of integrity. John Calvin 's personal motto, also adopted by Calvin College. A popular school motto. Often used as names for religious and other organisations such as the Pontifical Council Cor Unum. A phrase from Christian theology which summarizes the idea of Christians living in the presence of, under the authority of, and to the honor and glory of God ; see also coram Deo disambiguation.

Two kinds of writs of error. The name of a feast in the Roman Catholic Church commemorating the Eucharist. It is also the name of a city in Texas, Corpus Christi, Texas , the name of Colleges at Oxford and Cambridge universities, and a controversial play. The fact that a crime has been committed, a necessary factor in convicting someone of having committed that crime; if there was no crime, there can not have been a criminal.

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The official compilation of canon law in the Roman Catholic Church cf. The body of Roman or civil law. A person or thing fit only to be the object of an experiment, as in the phrase 'Fiat experimentum in corpore vili.


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  • Motto of the fictional Mayor 's office in The Simpsons. May he who has never loved before, love tomorrow; And may he who has loved, love tomorrow as well. The refrain from the 'Pervigilium Veneris', a poem which describes a three-day holiday in the cult of Venus, located somewhere in Sicily, involving the whole town in religious festivities joined with a deep sense of nature and Venus as the "procreatrix", the life-giving force behind the natural world.

    A concept about creation, often used in a theological or philosophical context. Also known as the 'First Cause' argument in philosophy of religion. Contrasted with creatio ex materia. The first words of the Nicene Creed and the Apostles' Creed. A very common misquote of Tertullian 's et mortuus est Dei Filius prorsus credibile quia ineptum est and the Son of God is dead: The misquoted phrase, however, is commonly used to mock the dogmatic beliefs of the religious see fideism. This phrase is commonly shortened to credo quia absurdum , and is also sometimes rendered credo quia impossibile est I believe it because it is impossible or, as Darwin used it in his autobiography, credo quia incredibile.

    Motto of Cheverus High School. Motto of the University of Chicago. Often rendered in English as "Let knowledge grow from more to more, And so be human life enriched," so as to achieve an iambic meter.

    List of Latin phrases (C)

    Motto of James Cook University. Motto of Claremont McKenna College. State motto of New Mexico , adopted in as the territory's motto, and kept in when New Mexico received statehood. Originally from Lucretius ' De rerum natura book VI, where it refers in context to the motion of a thunderbolt across the sky, which acquires power and momentum as it goes. Also the motto of the Crime Syndicate of America , a fictional supervillain group.

    The opposite is cui malo Bad for whom? Short for cui prodest scelus is fecit for whom the crime advances, he has done it in Seneca 's Medea. Thus, the murderer is often the one who gains by the murder cf. Whose the land is, all the way to the sky and to the underworld is his. First coined by Accursius of Bologna in the 13th century.

    A Roman legal principle of property law that is no longer observed in most situations today. Less literally, "For whosoever owns the soil, it is theirs up to the sky and down to the depths.