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Contents:


  1. 4 Ways Your College Classes Will Be Different From Your High School Classes
  2. 4 Ways Your College Classes Will Be Different From Your High School Classes | HuffPost
  3. 45 Pings/Trackbacks for "Students Think They Can Multitask. Here’s Proof They Can’t."
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So what should you do to make sure you don't sink in the much larger classroom pond? Stranger no-danger Don't be alarmed if you see not one familiar face when you walk into the room on the first day. Yes, it'll be intimidating, but just plop yourself down next to a stranger. Bigger classes, especially lectures, are all about listening and taking notes, so there will be minimal time to talk to your neighbors anyway. Get study buddies As the semester progresses and you get to know your lovely peers, you can mimic the tight-knit community of a high school class by studying in groups.

Not only will this opportunity to discuss the material with others feel like a small class, but it will likely boost your grade too. Strategies for Success , a resource compiled by the University of Michigan advising center, explains that studying with others is helpful for sharing the workload, solving complex problems, increasing motivation, and preparing for the real world. Ideally, cap the group at five or six people so it doesn't get too rowdy, and choose students that actually go to class.

4 Ways Your College Classes Will Be Different From Your High School Classes

If you don't know really know anyone in your lecture, you can email your class's list-serv asking if anyone is interested -- it'll be a great way to meet new people. Seek out small classes If by the end of your first semester you realize that big classes are really not for you, talk to your advisor about finding smaller courses, such as seminars or discussions, that better cater to your needs.

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Unfortunately, intro-level courses are almost always big, so you may just have to stick it out until you get to more advanced courses as an upperclassman. In the land of high school, laptops are usually not the norm or allowed and you are instead forced to rely on the good old-fashioned pencil and notebook system. In college, however, laptops dominate the classroom scene. How should you prepare to make the switch? Use protection You don't want to risk scratching or damaging that precious piece of merchandise by letting it fly solo in your bag.

4 Ways Your College Classes Will Be Different From Your High School Classes | HuffPost

Get a cute case and keep that baby covered. Take note Before classes even begin, set up a format for typing notes. Whether you dig Roman numerals or bullet points, Times New Roman or Arial, your life will be a lot easier if you find a system that works best for you and make a template so that you don't have to fuss with that formatting palette during class. Figure out whether you prefer a Word document, Google Docs, or a different system. Also, determine a specific way to label and file all your notes so that you're computer desktop is just as organized as you'll be.

Exercise self-control Before you get too excited about toting that sleek computer to class, understand that this privilege has its drawbacks. If you're too busy Facebooking, Tweeting, and Pinning, there is no way you are going to absorb all that the professor says. You may think you can just rely on the textbook or notes and lecture slides posted online, but often tests will include material taught only in class. If you don't think you keep yourself from surfing the World Wide Web, try installing a program like Self Control that will block you out of sites for a certain period of time.

Or, just don't bring your laptop at all. That pencil and notebook system got you through twelve years of schooling for a reason. Some students stick to notebooks from the beginning or deter to them after their laptops fail them, so you won't be the odd one out. Gone are the glory days when your school gave or lent you the textbooks you needed each year.

Now, you have to pay to buy or rent textbooks. Most of your classes will require several textbooks and books for the semester your professor will post this information online or in the syllabus , and you will be responsible for hunting down these pricy publications. How should you proceed to ensure the least amount of damage to your bank account?

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Ask your elders Before you even begin your hunt, consult a wise upperclassman or your RA. These veteran sources will know of the best locations on campus as well as online resources to buy or rent books. Many schools have online forums or Facebook groups for students selling their old textbooks to post on, and these offers will often be cheaper than a bookstore.

Find older students who have taken the class in question -- they might still have their books lying around and even if they don't, they'll be able to give you great insight into your future workload.


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Compare campus bookstores If there is more than one bookstore on campus, make sure to compare prices and rental options. Used books will always be cheaper than new ones, so unless it's in utterly unusable condition, opt for the sloppy seconds.


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If you are not bent on highlighting, renting is a cheap alternative to buying, and you won't have to worry about selling your books at the end of the course. Another cheaper route is finding loose-leaf textbooks, which are unbound. All you have to do is put the pages in a binder and you're set. Look online Once you've compared bookstore prices, check online to see if sites like Chegg , Amazon , or eBay have any better offers.

Just don't forget to factor in shipping costs! High-school graduates looking for career training can find many programs at community colleges or through a growing array of new offerings like coding academies and apprenticeships, some of which allow students to earn a salary and attend schools free.

Kathleen Mallee and her husband are both professionals with college degrees in the well-heeled Philadelphia suburb of Collegeville—and they always figured their year-old daughter would follow in their footsteps. But she has her heart set on a vocational school, where she wants to study cosmetology and computer science.

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That was my expectation. Write to Douglas Belkin at doug.

As worries about student debt rise, states and businesses increasingly push faster, cheaper paths to the workplace; parents are stumped. Dow Jones, a News Corp company. News Corp is a network of leading companies in the worlds of diversified media, news, education, and information services. Raelee Nicholson, a high-school junior and National Honor Society member, is rebuilding a Pontiac TransAm in the garage of her home south of Pittsburgh.

By Douglas Belkin Douglas Belkin. Still, the decision to forgo a four-year degree runs counter to 30 years of conventional wisdom. Close Why an honors student wants to skip college and go to trade school As worries about student debt rise, states and businesses increasingly push faster, cheaper paths to the workplace; parents are stumped From.