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  1. Greek and Roman Comedy: Translations and Interpretations of Four Representative Plays
  2. Top Authors
  3. Greek and Roman Comedy: Translations and Interpretations of Four - Google Книги
  4. Greek and Roman Comedy : Translations and Interpretations of Four Representative Plays

U of Texas Press Bolero Ozon. Greek and Roman Comedy: Translations and Interpretations of Four Representative Plays. A Note on the Translation. Translations and Interpretations of Four Greek and Roman comedy: All right, Bushel-of-Lies, give the Athenians the message from the King!

He says the King's going to send you gold. Say the word "gold" louder and clearer.

Greek and Roman Comedy: Translations and Interpretations of Four Representative Plays

He says us Ionians are a bunch of butt-fucks, if we're expecting any gold from barbarians! The Torture of Knemon in Menander's Dyskolos.


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In this essay, O'B. The final moments of the play, in which Knemon stubbornly clings to his desire to be left alone and is forced to participate in a women's wedding dance before rejoining his social group, have puzzled many scholars, and many have offered implausible pat answers to the thorny issue of the meaning of the play's resolution: Menander gave in to his audience's basest instincts by ending his play with crude humor; or, it is a trope of New Comedy that the blocking character must be humiliated at the end of the play p.

Thus Knemon, who has been "playing" the stock role of the poor farmer for which he is ill-equipped, is compelled by Getas and Sikon to shed his misanthropic world view and be reintegrated into his family and into his society pp. In his preface, he states that the contributors followed a few important guidelines in rendering their translations: The fact that O'B.

Top Authors

When I have taught this play in the past, many of my students have actually preferred Menander to Aristophanes, and certainly his play is more universal, less vulgar and more easily applicable to a variety of human situations. George Frederic Franko F. In his treatment of Plautus and his Greek models, F. This comparison makes it clear to the newcomer to Roman comedy that even though Plautus borrowed his plots and other dramatic elements from his Greek predecessors, he nevertheless made the material his and was wildly popular in his own time and for centuries to follow because of his unique genius.

This could give the neophyte the false impression that only Plautus cared about and employed metrical effects in his plays, and that only Plautine comedies were enhanced by music and dance. Tradition and Variation in Casina" is taken up by plot summary.

Greek and Roman Comedy: Translations and Interpretations of Four - Google Книги

That, however, may be a welcome thing for many readers who will be unfamiliar with the chaotic machinations of Plautine plots. This is not a terribly venturesome approach to be fair, none of the analytical essays in this volume aims to be audacious , but F. I think this was a smart choice, especially because it does not seem to be a "typical" Plautine play -- in other words, not a play along the lines of Pseudolus, with a scheming slave as the star.

In his introduction F. This is a minor objection to F. Despite the fact that at times the dialogue can be a bit clunky, F. He is also the most careful to distinguish the changes in meter by creating more lyrical passages when the meter suggests a song which is in keeping with his obviously greater interest in meter than the other contributors. He explains the marked differences between Plautine and Terentian style by noting that although Terence's contributions to Roman theater may not have been as flashy as Plautus', Terence nevertheless succeeded in leaving his mark on theatrical history with four important changes in dramatic emphasis: This play very nicely rounds out the volume, then, by highlighting Terence's unique style while at the same time adding a significant contribution to the presentation of Greek and Roman comedy as a whole.

Greek and Roman Comedy : Translations and Interpretations of Four Representative Plays

In his analytical essay, "Who is the Parasite? Giving and Taking in Phormio," M. The end result, M.

In this Book

Still, again like O'B. As a whole and in its individual parts, this volume accomplishes the goals laid out by its editor admirably. The authors have created a sound, practical and much-needed text for classroom use. My criticisms that the scholarship is not particularly adventurous may well be unfair, since the authors seem to have specifically set out to reach as broad an audience as possible and therefore may have concluded that controversial or non-traditional points of view would be inappropriate.


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  6. Still, I would have liked to see a broader range of bibliography and a broader perspective at times. Henry, "Ethos, Mythos, Praxis:

    3. Inferno I, II, III, IV